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Discovering Solutions for Dementia Symptoms

 

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The purpose of this research is to better understand when and why people living with dementia have behavioral symptoms such as repeating the same question over and over.

We are exploring a variety of possible causes such as environmental triggers, genetic risk factors, inflammatory markers, and microbiome (our gut bacteria).

How do you participate?

We are enrolling both persons living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and their family caregivers - who live in Houston and surrounding areas.

For caregivers: At the enrollment visit, we will ask you to complete a survey that helps us get to know you, your loved one, and your daily life. Then, we will ask you to complete short diary surveys about behavioral symptoms you observe while caring for your loved one. These surveys will also ask about things that happened during the day such as visitors you had or activities your loved one did. These diary surveys will be completed daily for 30 days. 

For persons living with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias: At the enrollment visit, we will get to know you and your family member. At the second visit, we will ask you for a sample of your blood, your saliva, and your stool. We will do this every week for 5 weeks. We will come visit you at your home to collect this information so that you do not have to travel.

If you have questions, or to find out if you’re eligible, you can contact the research study team at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Call Vicki Winstead at 713-500-2123 or email us at caregiver@uth.tmc.edu and mention the "Discovering Solutions" study.

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All participants will be compensated for their time. For the person living with dementia, we can also provide your results from genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease.